Latest News

Protecting and restoring your river

Monday, May 20, 2019

River restoration is often mentioned in these pages and is the ultimate aim of the Wild Trout Trust and many other organisations. Restoration is not only about making improvements for fish and wildlife, but finding solutions that are accepted by the local community and landowners and which will work in the long term. The natural processes of erosion, sediment transport and deposition make rivers dynamic, constantly changing systems. It is important to understand and work with these processes for projects to be successful.

Wandle Cleanup

Thursday, May 16, 2019

For the Wandle Trust's May cleanup they headed to Plough Lane in Merton. They started off the day with a Welcome Talk and Health & Safety briefing. For the first time this year they were lucky to have lovely sunny weather, so everyone was very eager to crack on with wading and litter picking around the banks.

NERC invests £1.3 million to engage the UK public on big issues in environmental science

Thursday, May 16, 2019

An innovative project that will see researchers collaborate with diverse communities on issues in environmental science has been awarded £1·3 million through NERC's Engaging Environments programme. The award is NERC's largest single investment in public engagement, with project partners pledging a further £235,000 of in-kind contributions.

Illustration of a vision for science for all

Arup and Atkins among consultants picked for £2.6bn EA investment plan

Thursday, May 16, 2019

The Environment Agency (EA) has named the consultants it is to work with on delivering its £2.6bn capital investment plan.

Arup, Jacobs UK, Atkins and Jeremy Benn Associates have all won contracts aimed at “increasing efficiency, value for money and the green legacy” of the EA’s investment programme, which aims to protect 300,000 homes from coastal erosion and flooding up to 2021.

The contractors chosen were Bam Nuttal, VolkerStevin, Jackson Civil Engineering Group and Kier Integrated Services.

Research shines light on the hidden world beneath our feet

Tuesday, May 14, 2019

Farm soils in Wales have a richer variety and number of microbial species than in woodland, bogs and conservation land, new research has found.

The two-year study used advanced DNA techniques to identify the microscopic invertebrates, bacteria and fungi in soils that are essential to the survival of plants and animals and are also vital for food production.

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