Latest News

Some like it hot, but our wetlands do not

Thursday, October 3, 2019
Heatwaves can spell trouble for our freshwater habitats, as The Wildlife Trusts’ Water Policy Manager Ali Morse explains.

Hot summer days might seem like a blessing. People flock to the beach, flowers bloom and insects thrive, providing food for birds and bats. But a warm summer can be an issue for other species, particularly those that rely on our rivers and wetlands.

River engineering may damage the long-term viability of freshwater species by changing the availability and quality of physical habitat

Monday, September 30, 2019

People have been modifying Scotland’s rivers in many ways for centuries. Legislation is now driving the restoration of engineered river systems to their previous, natural state.

Many of our rivers have been:

Funding Opportunity: UKRI citizen science exploration grants

Friday, September 20, 2019

UK Research and innovation is launching a new £400,000 funding call to encourage researchers and innovators to experiment with citizen science.

Citizen science is an important way in which diverse groups of people can participate and collaborate in research and innovation. This could include crowdsourcing data, working with volunteers to analyse existing datasets, collaborating with communities in designing research programmes, and approaches to innovation that involve diverse groups of people in the innovation process.  

UK’s prized habitats remain in bad condition, government data shows

Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Some of the UK's most iconic habitats and species, such as blanket bog and dormice, remain in a bad or poor condition, according to government data.

Some animals, such as the mountain hare, have actually seen their status downgraded due to their ongoing decline, according to the latest environmental assessment of the UK’s European designated sites, published earlier this month by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee  on the European Environment Agency’s data collection website, Eionet.

Improved wastewater treatment has led to wildlife ‘success story’, research shows

Monday, September 16, 2019

Insect life has rebounded in a river receiving all of Swindon's wastewater thanks to substantial investments to improve sewage treatment, according to a DEFRA-funded study.

The River Ray in Wiltshire, which lies downstream of Swindon’s major sewage plant, is largely formed of treated wastewater and had seen steep declines in wildlife populations from the 1960s onwards. 

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